February 29, 2012

How to Start a Taxi Business

Author: John Edwards

Firstly, it is important to analyse and understand which 'market' segment you may wish to enter – standard city taxi operation, airport transfers, business/executive work or top end chauffeur work. All have similarities but are each are very separate markets in their own right and each have their pros and cons:

1. City/town minicab/taxi operation:

Pros: often easy to set up and start to make money, relatively low start up costs, vehicle standards will vary but in the main will once again be affordable, with the use of special offers it is is easy to 'penetrate' the local market, mainly cash market – good for cashflow!

Cons: too much competition leads to falling prices, easy to copy and so you might also find other new entrants into the market place, transient workforce [drivers come and go a lot in the trade], a trade that does sometimes suffer a 'shady' image, long hours manning the phones and a need to operate 24/7, drivers abusing managed cars, health and safety for staff during night shift and managing late night revellers.

2. Airport Transfers

Pros: Once again easy to set up using a website, often better quality work that offers drivers a chance to take more money with fewer jobs during any one day, more glamourous side of the business, if managed correctly a good operator will be able to get a job to and possibly from the same airport too, no drunks! See example with Stansted Taxis.

Cons: Super competitive market place, lots of operators, keen prices, drivers often sat at airports for long hours waiting for customers, flight delays, and parking charges that all must be taken into account.

3. Business Accounts/Executive Work

Pros: Quality long distance work in most cases, work with better quality vehicles, more stable if working with right clients, the chance to build up a real rapport with clients, more profit!

Cons: Difficult to penetrate market place that is dominated by 'relationship management' [not what you know, it's who you know], the requirement to provide credit [90 days in most cases] which brings with it risks in terms of cash flow, higher start up costs, power to the customer – they are always right and will, if given the chance, seek to depress prices all of the time whilst demanding an ever increasing standard of service!

The key to success in the market place is to pick your segment carefully in terms of your knowledge, financial backing and contacts within the business. For example, it is no good rushing out to buy a luxury Mercedes S Class unless you have a portfolio of contacts who will be willing to pay the premium necessary for you to make your enterprise viable. The secret to most firms successes in the business is start off modestly at first and slowly build up your business – it is the only way if you want to avoid quickly racking up debts and having to literally buy work which is always the start of the end for most private hire and taxi companies.

The number one prioirty for both individuals and firms currently is price; everyone is looking for the cheapest option these days and with the advent of the internet this makes it even easier for customers to shop around. So what else to consider when deciding how to start your new taxi ro private hire company:

1. Work from home or office base?

A business of this type should always be started small scale if you have no experience. Costly office facilities and garages will cost thousands and will quickly eat into your bottom line if you haven't generated sufficient revenues into your new business. Some of the best taxi and private hire businesses were started at home! Once you have a few drivers you may then feel that the business is generating sufficient revenues that the ' next step' is to open up a local office [shop] or work from a base which will enable you to operate the business more professionally. Example, see Clapham Minicabs.

2. Maintenance / insurance costs of your chosen vehicle[s]

Your choice of car is a significant and costly decision in this business. Dependent upon which market segment you are trying to enter will undoubtedly determine which type or style of vehicle[s] you will opt for. Cash rich minicab firms [where allowed] often make a good living from working with low value cars that are cheap to buy and do not suffer any depreciation. This is fine until you realise that your business image is one of 'cheap' 'minicab' which might not be what you want to be involved. In contrast the exceutive end of the market sounds great but the overall outlay is fraught with a difficult type of risk – a financial one and the need for you to keep up with your monthly payments however quiet things might get! Just becuase you think your car will make you money – don't assume the general public wish to use your services. When it comes to vehciles the key is to keep costs down and maximise your earning potential – this is why the trade always like the ubtiqueous MPV – diesel fuel and 5/6 seats which makes its earning potential one of the best in the business. Maintenance and insuirance costs will also be reasonable.

3. Your would be local competition – is there a 'gap' you can seek to exploit – have they not got a vehicle which mean you could supply this to the market [remember, just doing what everyone else offers won't be enough - the old saying is that you won't necessarily bring any new business to the business, you will simply take existing business away from others!]

4. Licence implications – do you need a knowledge test?

Taxi tests and regulations imposed by a Local Authority Taxi Licensing Departmentvary greatly and will influence your decision as to whether or not wokring in a particular area is financially viable for a driver. To be hackney carrioage driver in London for example – you need to pass 'the knowledge' which is an arduous 3/4 years learning curve before you have taken anything! Once secured though it is a licence to operate freely in one fo the worlds busiest cities. Most large provincial cities and towns will have a basic knowledge test [nothing like the London test] that you will need to astudy for an complete before doing anything. Do your homework – you have been warned!

5. Your own work/life balance

Taxi work is arguably one of the most flexible ways of being able to make a living if you are self employed. Work when you like. This is great when you are single and with no other commitments – chuck in a wife, kids, bills to pay and a mortgage and then the pressure to 'earn well' when you are on the road increases dramatically which will add to your stress levels! You therefore need a robust plan, a strategy to ensure that you have steady stream of work and opportunities at any one time.

6. Account work vs cash

For many newcomers into the trade the lure of 'account work' always appears more glam or more professional. It is in fact fraught with risk for the naive operator. Any new operator should concern themselves with getting as much cash work as they can – cash is king – you can have loads of account work but if you run out of cash to fill your car up with fuel then your business is dead. The real trick is to get a healthy balance between the two – good account work that pays and a steady stream of cash work [or immediate payment work]. Some companies really push cab and chauffeur firms hard these days to drive down prices – this a slippery slope and one that all new operators should be weary of. Stick to your prices, maintain your standards and you will ok. The moment you 'buy work' then the more difficult your negotiation position becomes. In terms of accounts, small is beautiful – lots of small accounts then allow you spread your risks. Having a large account with one business is rather like placing all of your eggs in one basket – if you owed 3 months and they go out of business you can guess the next bit! It is recommended that whilst you do account work, try to build up a strong relationship with that client, encourage payments on time by offering slight discounts for early settlement of the monthly account or incentives to the clients. Cash on the other hand is an essential part of any usccessful cab operation – as with all aspects tough it needs to be managed!

7. Internet?

This is like the new yellow pages – most people nowadays source their taxi numbers from the internet and so if you have a really great business name and easy to remember telephone number – this is not going to be enough in the 21st Century. You must get online with a website that is well optimised in the search engines and can clearly market you as the local choice for taxis, airports, business work, etc. For great taxi websites check out taxi bookings online.

This is just a whistle stop guide to what to look out for if you are considering a career as a taxi or private hire operator. The porblem you will find is that like most businesses the cab trade make this business look easy. It isn't easy, and is in fact a risky business. You can however take comfort in the fact that as there are so many cabn companies operating, this means that the demand for private hire / taxis is growing as more and more people make use of them. Like any business start up it will always be better if you plan carefully, think about your competition and ensure that always think about your 'cash' position when starting out. Rome was not built in a day!

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/business-opportunities-articles/how-to-start-a-taxi-business-5268878.html

About the Author

Travel writer, airport guide writer, taxi critic and entrepreneur from the UK.

February 28, 2012

Walkers and Canes

Author: Lynn Porter

Mobility devices, such as walkers and canes, are designed to help a number of different people. You may see older people using them primarily, but they are also effective for those with temporary or permanent disabilities. It has been stated that over 7 million people in the United States alone use these devices for assistance when getting around. It is important that high quality medical walkers and canes are chosen to help these people.

The most important aspect of matching walkers and canes to the patient who will be using them is the safety aspect. The device should be thoroughly inspected prior to use. This will help prevent an accident from occurring due to a faulty or low quality mobility device. It is also important that they are the right dimensions depending on the person\'s height and weight that is using them. If there is any risk of injury to the user, do not provide them with the device and find a better one instead.

Comfort is another factor when getting a device to help a person move about. A medical walker may offer more support to those who need the additional assistance to walk. This can make some people feel more secure when they are trying to move, especially if they have weak legs or are prone to falling. They are typically recommended for those who have had injury or operations on their legs or hips.

If they merely need an extra leg of support, a cane may be enough. They should be comfortable with whichever device they are using. It needs to be an appropriate height so they are not stooped over while walking with the assistance. Be sure to learn how to properly position the cane so that it can offer the most support possible when in use.

In order to assess the walkers and canes, you can do each of the following. First, make sure that the device meets the wrists of the person using it according to height. This will prevent them from having to bend over so far that it will be too uncomfortable. Have them use the device while you are watching to see if they are slumped over. Also, check the bottoms of the walker or cane every week to make sure the rubber tips are not too worn. Replace them as necessary.

As you can see, there are a few considerations to make when trying to choose the highest quality walkers and canes for patients. You want to be sure that the mobility device is truly going to help them. There should be a tiny, if any, chance that they could fall or injure themselves while using the device. Some accidents cannot be prevented, but many can if you take the time to check the quality, comfort, and safety of the medical walker before allowing the patient to use it.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/home-and-family-articles/walkers-and-canes-4858928.html

About the Author

With MedicalWalkerOnline.com's one-stop shopping, superior quality walkers and canes at incredible prices, you are sure to find exactly what you are looking for and much more.

February 26, 2012

Taxi Safety

Author: Ann Brown

Taking a taxi we focus on our comfort, but we should be also concerned about our safety. We reduce a risk when we order taxi online or find it in Yellow Pages, but if we do not do it, there is a list of taxi tips you should know before getting into a cab.

1. Always use only licenced Taxis and PHVs.
The driver must have their ‘badge’ and the car its ‘plate’. Identify them prior to entering the vehicle and closing the door. They should display licence number, expiry date and the picture of the driver or description of the vehicle. You should never agree to travel in an unlicensed vehicle with an unlicensed driver. If they are not licensed, have not been vetted for safety purposes and are not insured for your journey.
You can hail a taxi in the street or get one at a rank, or pre-book it. Private hire vehicles (PHVs, known as minicabs) must always be booked through a licensed operator. If you are approached by someone in the street offering you or your friends a taxi or any other type of vehicle for hire, ignore them.

2. If you pre-book your taxi check that the taxi that arrives is the one you booked.
Ask the Operator for a description of the car and check these details when the vehicle arrives. It would be good practice to also ask for the name of the driver beforehand.

3. Let someone else know the details of your journey.
If you are especially cautious, you might consider sending a text message to friends before entering the taxi. In your message, be sure to include the license plates, driver’s name, and identification number.


4. Do not get into the cab if there is someone else in addition to the driver
Be wary of getting into taxis that already have strangers on board or of being asked to share with strangers. Anyway, splitting the bill is confusing and shared taxis are not nearly as comfortable.

5. Always sit in the back of the vehicle behind the driver and carry your mobile phone in your hand so it is easily accessible.
Know emergency contact numbers and if a taxi driver starts giving you trouble, let him or her know that you know the appropriate emergency contact numbers, and you’re not afraid to use them.

6. Know where you are going
It is harder for taxi drivers to cheat you if you know exactly where you’re going. Before you accept shortcuts, detours, and special stops, make sure you know where you are, where you were, and where it is you ultimately want to go. Know the route or general direction to your destination.

7. Fares and tipping
To avoid potential disputes with taxi drivers, know the local tipping customs. Ask a hotel staff member or your host for the typical price range to your destination and the amount of an appropriate tip. Try to get a firm or estimated fare from your driver before you start.

8. Pay while in the cab
Know enough about the local currency to identify the bill. Make sure you have small bills as drivers won’t always be able to break large notes. Exchange money while you are still in a taxicab. That way, you can have your purse or wallet properly stored once you exit the taxi.

9. Avoid travelling on your own
There is safety in numbers, so traveling with a companion minimizes your risks and makes it much less likely that you will ever encounter a potential problem.

10. Ensure your safety outside the taxi.
When you get to your destination, ask the driver to wait and watch until you are safely inside or ask to be let out in a well-lit area where there are plenty of people.

You do not need to bother much about your safety if you place your taxi request with online booking company such as www.FairFare.co.uk. First of all, you are sure that you go with fully registered taxi operator. You receive all your journey details and taxi operators contact details to your email box, and you have saved a clear record of all your previous journeys. Moreover, you can try your barging skills entering your price expectations and when your request is booked, your price is guaranteed. These are just few benefits of online taxi booking with http://www.fairfare.co.uk

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/travel-tips-articles/taxi-safety-477510.html

About the Author

Aged 26, professional, interested in many areas of life like: history, online shopping, travelling, leading an eco friendly life style. Currently may favourite website http://www.fairfare.co.uk


February 25, 2012

What To Expect When Using A Wheelchair Taxi

Author: John k. Taylor

When using a wheelchair taxi or multi-purpose taxi (MPT) for the first time, it may be hard to know what to expect and what you can or cannot do. This is a helpful guide for wheelchair users who have never used a multi-purpose taxi before or who do not use one very often.

How many wheelchairs and passengers can an MPT carry? Some wheelchair taxis are licensed to carry 2 wheelchair passengers at a time, as well as 5 able-bodied passengers, while others can only carry 1 wheelchair and 8 able-bodied passengers.

How do I catch a wheelchair taxi? You can do this in one of three ways. Firstly, a passenger is able to hail a vacant taxi on the street. If the light on top of a taxi is turned on, the vehicle is available for business but will only pull over if it is safe to do so. Secondly, a passenger can find a taxi rank (usually out the front of major train stations and busy streets, as well as airports) and get into the first available vehicle. Some ranks will have marshals who can radio for a multi-purpose taxi if there is not one waiting. As both these options can be difficult for disabled passengers, the best option is the third one: to telephone the taxi company. When booking, make sure to tell the operator that the MPT is for a disabled passenger, as you will generally get priority over other callers.

Will I be charged an MPT booking fee if I am in a wheelchair? No, passengers who have booked a wheelchair taxi cannot be charged the usual booking fee. Even if you are not travelling alone, and your fellow passengers are able-bodied, the fact remains that a wheelchair taxi is your only taxi option.

Can I stay seated in my wheelchair during travel? As long as you and your wheelchair can be appropriately secured, you are able to remain seated during the taxi trip. This is also providing that the weight, including that of the operator, does not exceed the weight limit of the lift. You also have the option of moving to a seat in the taxi while your wheelchair is secured in the back.

Am I required to wear a seatbelt? Whilst travelling in a wheelchair taxi, it is essential that all passengers wear seatbelts. Wheelchairs and their occupants must face forwards and have a secure lap belt in place. As well as this, there must be a way for the chair, and its passenger, to be quickly released from the vehicle in case of an accident or emergency.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/rentals-articles/what-to-expect-when-using-a-wheelchair-taxi-5459704.html


About the Author
This information is shared by Harrie on the behalf of Capital Special Vehicles. Capital Special Vehicles provides professional solutions of vehicle conversions for vans and taxi to convert them in wheelchair vans and wheelchair taxi.

February 24, 2012

Special Buses for Disabled Students

Author: abhishek

The road to Delhi University will be much easier for the differently-abled from this year. DU is starting the special bus for students with special needs on the north campus from Tuesday. The bus service was inaugurated Monday, 13th July 2009.

Nearly 380 differently-abled students have registered with DU this year. As the new session begins on July 16, they will be able to use the bus service to commute within the campus for free. The bus will be available on Tuesday from Vishwavidyalaya Metro Station for the orientation programme being organized by DU's Equal Opportunity Cell (EOC) for the differently-abled.

Officials said it will be a circular service within the campus with a frequency of 30-minutes and may also connect the nearby colleges like Satyawati and Lakshmibai. EOC may start a similar bus service connecting the north and south campus in the coming months.

Students on the wheelchair can board it using a hydraulic lift fitted at the rear door. The bus has 18 seats along with room to accommodate four wheelchairs. It also has a crutch box, colour-contrasted handrails and stop request buttons. IIT Delhi students have fitted an audio announcement system in the bus.

According to officials, the driver and the conductor have been sensitized to the needs of the differently-abled. The conductor will carry a phone on which the students can call and know the location of the bus.

The bus was procured in February this year and planned to start service during the admission season. But it could not be put on the road because of administrative hurdles, say the University of Delhi officials. Some officials said glitches too delayed the service.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/learning-disabilities-articles/special-buses-for-disabled-students-1041769.html

About the Author Abhishek Sinha

February 23, 2012

6 Parenting Tips on Special Education Law and Transportation

Author: XyleBelita

Do you wonder what the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) states is the schools responsibility, to provide transportation for your child? This article will discuss what IDEA requires as far as transportation for your child with a disability. Also discussed are parenting tips that you can use, to help your child receive this important service.

Under IDEA transportation is considered a related service. A related service is transportation, developmental, corrective, and other services. . .as may be required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education. . .
What this means is that if your child requires transportation in order to benefit from their education, special education personnel are required to provide it.

Parenting Tips:

1. When advocating for your child, remember that; transportation not only means to and from school, but also in and around the school building, and any specialized equipment required by your child.

2. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act prevents discrimination on the basis of disability. The law reads: No qualified student shall on the basis of handicap, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any . . .transportation. . .or activity.

For Example: Your child with a physical disability is not allowed to go on a field trip, because the class cannot get the wheelchair bus. This would be a section 504 complaint, because your child is being discriminated against, on the basis of their disability. I have dealt with this situation, and the school district usually quickly fixes the transportation problem, if you tell them that you may file a Section 504 complaint. Section 504 is covered by the Office of Civil Rights in Washington, though each state has at least one office.

3. If your child requires an assistant in the classroom then you may be able to get a bus assistant, if your child's disability requires it. The goal of transportation as a related service is to provide safe access to education. So if your child needs a bus assistant in order to get safely to school, school personnel are required to provide it.

4. If your school district is not providing needed transportation for your child, you can be reimbursed, for providing the transportation yourself. Make sure that your child's IEP, states that they need transportation as a related service, and that you will be reimbursed.

A district may also be required to reimburse parents where:

A. Transportation is needed to provide FAPE and the district fails to meet its obligation.
B. The district doesn't recognize the need for transportation.
C. The district makes inadequate provisions for transportation.

5. If your child's extracurricular activity is related to their IEP goals and objectives, then transportation must be given. For Example: If your child has autism and needs to work on social skills, they can gain that from extra curricular activities. In that case transportation needs to be given by your school district.

6. School districts are not allowed to shorten your child's school day due to transportation. Unfortunately it happens all the time, and you may have to stand up to special education personnel for the good of your child.

IDEA gives children with disabilities equal educational opportunity, which means a full school day. I have often said that if parents of children without disabilities found out there child was to leave school early for transportation, they would be outraged. But parents of special needs children are supposed to accept it. Do not accept it, stand up for your child.

This article has given you a lot of good information about transportation, that you can use to benefit your child's education.

JoAnn Collins is the mother of two adults with disabilities, and has helped families navigate the special eduation system, as an advocate, for over 15 years. She is a presenter and author of the book 'Disability Deception; Lies Disability Educators Tell and How Parents Can Beat Them at Their Own Game.' The book has a lot of resources and information to help parents fight for an appropriate education for their child. For a free E newsletter entitled 'The Special Education Spotlight' send an E mail to: JoAnn@disabilitydeception.com For more information on the book, testimonials about the book, and a link to more articles go to: http://www.disabilitydeception.com


Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/home-and-family-articles/6-parenting-tips-on-special-education-law-and-transportation-4561806.html
About the Author

February 22, 2012

Accessible Adventures: Traveling with Special Needs

Author: Gina Reed

If vacation or business travel has been a daunting idea to you or to your family, be encouraged that there many places to explore where special needs can be easily accommodated with your comfort and convenience in mind.


You Have Places to Go & Things to Do


Family Vacations – Travel options abound for families with special needs children. Ranging from amusement and theme parks designed for a number of disabilities or camps that offer programs and accommodations for a broad spectrum of special needs, there are exciting possibilities for making fun family memories! Vacations to Disney World, National Parks, museums, and the like can also be accessible for those with disabilities through the utilization of things like travel wheelchairs, access guides, and travel agents that specialize in travel with disabilities.


Travel Planning for Special Needs – there are a number of companies that specialize in creating group tours, cruises, and individual wheelchair travel options. These companies develop itineraries and travel arrangements that facilitate special needs accessibility. Their travel agents assist in making arrangements and providing the appropriate resources to make your experience an enjoyable and memorable one.

Travel Resources for Special Needs


Travel Wheelchairs - The right travel chair can make any trip less stressful and much more comfortable. There are travel wheelchairs that are especially designed for making travel feasible and safe. Look for chairs that are comfortable and durable, but also lightweight, compact or collapsible, and easy to maneuver.


Travel Agencies & Tour Groups – A number of travel agencies and tour groups that specialize in travel arrangements for people with disabilities have developed over the years. Theses agencies and groups provide assistance in planning and executing vacations for people with a broad range of special needs.


Travel Companions – Whether you require assistance from a companion to manage daily activities or simply want someone to travel with, there are companies that can offer these services. Be sure to search for companions from reputable companies or with credible references.


Accessibility Guides – There are a number of publications, websites, & blogs available to assist with your travel planning. These guides outline destinations, accommodations, transportation, and other resources for traveling with disabilities.


Online Resources:


Disability Travel and Recreation Resources


Society for Accessible Travel & Hospitality

Additional Travel Tips


Airplane Travel – Travel by airplane can be a bit intimidating for some travelers, especially if you must travel with a wheelchair or have mobility restrictions. Airlines are required to provide reasonable accommodation for individuals with special needs, but that does not mean you should leave your travel comfort in the airline's hands. A little extra planning on your part can make for a much more enjoyable airport and flying experience.



  • Plan to arrive two to three hours prior to a domestic flight or up to four hours prior to an international flight to ensure enough time to get through security and make your way to the gate.

  • If you experience discomfort after sitting for extended periods of time, strongly consider selecting destinations where travel times are limited. You should also consider if limited mobility is an issue, restroom use on the plane may be difficult. Some airlines provide small chairs to transport guests to the restroom, but if this is not an option, it would be wise to limit your time in the air.

  • It may be a bit more expensive to secure non-stop flights for your trip, but limiting connections can reduce the stress of navigating multiple airports in a restricted time period.

  • Research the airline and plane ahead of time. Can the plane size accommodate a wheelchair in the cabin? Can you reserve an aisle seat?

  • Individuals in wheelchairs or scooters are subject to thorough searches at the security checkpoints. While it may be a bit uncomfortable and tedious, these searches are to ensure the safety of all passengers.

  • If you require medication or have mobility restrictions, it can be helpful to secure a letter from your doctor to make the transition through security a little easier.


Hotel Accommodations – While most commercial establishments are required to provide handicap accessibility, there are a few things to consider for ensuring a successful hotel stay during your travels. Make your hotel reservations over the phone if possible. If applicable, ask about whether the doors to the rooms are wide enough for a wheelchair and that the restrooms and showers in the room are handicap accessible. Be sure to get a confirmation number for your reservation. For convenience, it is often good to request a room on the ground floor or be sure to verify that an elevator is available.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/travel-tips-articles/accessible-adventures-traveling-with-special-needs-5276743.html

About the Author

Gina Reed is a Marketing Manager for Convaid Lightweight Wheelchairs in Torrence, CA. Convaid's core mission is to provide special needs children, adults, and their families the highest quality compact-folding lightweight wheelchairs.

February 21, 2012

10 Point Checklist for Wheelchair Fitting

Author: Mary Martin

Appropriate wheelchair selection takes time and consideration of many factors. When conducting a wheelchair assessment, you should incorporate the goals of the client, therapist and caregiver, which sometimes may not be in agreement. To streamline the process, we have put together a 10 item checklist to assist in getting the best-fitting wheelchair for your client's needs, comfort and optimal functional.

1. Environment – what is the environment in which the client will be using the chair - in a nursing facility, at home, outside in the community? What is the layout of the home or facility, and will there be any space constraint issues, such as tight doorways, narrow hallways or high countertops?
2. Usage of Chair – how will the client be using the chair? Is he going to be wheelchair dependent for all mobility? Is she using the chair to complete ADL's (Activities of Daily Living)? How many hours will he be in the chair throughout each day?
3. Client's Physical Features – a person's height, weight, hip width, femur length and stature will determine the width, depth and height of the wheelchair.
4. Wheelchair Mobility – is your client able to propel a manual wheelchair? Can he propel with upper and/or lower extremities? Does she lack strength in her upper body? These factors will also determine the height and weight of the wheelchair. How will he transfer into and out of the chair? What is his range of motion? If the client can not propel, will she qualify for a power wheelchair and what type of controls will she need for safe, independent operation?
5. Cognition & Visual Acuity – what is the client\'s capacity for being able to safely operate the chair, see and respond to obstacles in his path and stop as needed.
6. Skin Integrity – Consider skin breakdown and sensitivity issues. Will the client require special cushions, backrests, leg rests, arm rests, etc?
7. Balance – can the client sit upright and unsupported? Lateral supports, backrests, head supports and other options may need to be considered.
8. Posture and pelvic positioning – wheelchair positioning begins with the pelvis. Is there a pelvic tilt, obliquity or rotation? Note the client's posture. Is there any scoliosis or kyphosis? Also assess hip, trunk, head and neck alignment.
9. Justification – as you assess the client's needs, as well as wheelchair and accessory design characteristics, there must be medical justification in order to meet insurance guidelines and obtain prior authorization when required.
10. Client-centered Process – actively involving the client and caregiver in the process is key to achieving a good outcome in wheelchair selection. Valuable information such as goals, expectations, daily routine, level of activity, maintenance, transportation of the chair and environment can usually be obtained through discussions with the client and caregiver. In the end, the wheelchair must be comfortable for the client or it will never be used.

Fitting a client with the right wheelchair is a complicated and important process. Optimizing that fit is crucial to improving his function and ease of use in his environment. Plus, it will ensure your client's safety and alleviate his health concerns. With the multitude of wheelchair and accessory options available, working with an experienced provider is also important. A provider can serve as your partner in gaining the best equipment for your client, and will also be able to fit and adjust the chair to gain maximal performance and function for your client.

For more information, visit Mobility4LESS University at http://www.mobility4less.com/mobility_tips_tools

Author: Mary Martin, in conjunction with Melissa Fisher, MSPT, ATP

© 2011 Mobility4LESS.com, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/disabilities-articles/10-point-checklist-for-wheelchair-fitting-5456833.html

About the Author




February 20, 2012

A Brief Guide on Starting a Private Transportation Business

Author: Mo Lotfy

Medical transportation needs are often unmet. While the healthcare industry growing rapidly, the transportation system should also keep pace with the same. If you have already set your mind for doing something innovative that would become an aid to the communities and the country as a whole besides earning money, you should give non-emergency medical transportation business a serious thought. Especially because the financial and non-financial benefits are manifold and investment required is not very high, many people are taking their steps forward to start their own transportation business. The market is really big and continues to expand. Let's take a quick glimpse of how to start up a private transportation business.

Assured Profit Vs Liberty
There are many private transportation agencies in the US who look for franchisees to spread their business in the whole of America. Taking a franchise has its own set of advantages. But it limits the profit margin of the entrepreneurs and there are other obligations as well. As the franchisees need to pay the franchise fees after regular intervals, they actually give a large share of what they earn. On the other hand, if you want to start your own private transportation business, you are sure to get endless liberty in operation and you don't have to report to anyone.

Important Considerations
If you have already planned to set up a business like this, you need to consider several factors before finally starting up one. You need to assess the demographics of the location where your business will be set up. Check whether a good number of disabled and aged people live in that area. You need to prepare a list of nearby hospitals as well. Thirdly, if you want to make money transporting clients , you need to check what your competitors offer and analyze their strengths and weaknesses. You can also closely follow how they operate their business and adopt the good sides.

Getting permits and licenses
Getting Licenses and Permits for private transportation business is not a different job altogether. You need to contact your local transportation authority and submit a proposal. Once they inspects the quality and condition of your car, your car insurance details, you're driving license and few other things, provided everything is fine, you are most likely to get the permit and other pertinent papers within a couple of days from applying. Paperwork is extremely important in this regard.

Prerequisites
You can start your own private transportation enterprise if you have a car or van, used or new. If you do not have one, you can opt for any trusted car dealer and buy a car. High return of investment is assured as medical transportation cars are always on high demand.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/business-articles/a-brief-guide-on-starting-a-private-transportation-business-5646363.html

About the Author

Start your own private transportation company today! Learn the nitty-gritty of private transportation business. Learn how to make money transporting clients here.

February 19, 2012

Yellow Cab - Paratransit Transportation Pomona

Author: Jordanjose

Paratransit transportation is Pomona is becoming increasingly common for two reasons. The first is that paratransit transportation allows for customers to be picked up and dropped off at a specific location, rather than a dictated stop. Thus, the driver does not have to follow a particular route but can tailor it to the customer's needs and time. How does this differ from a cab? Paratransit transportation allows the vehicle to be shared by multiple customers, reducing the cost of the transit as a whole. There is a small number of customers, which reduces overcrowding and increases comfort. The second aspect of paratransit transportation in Pomona is how beneficial it can be for elderly and disabled persons. Dealing with the sporadic and uncomfortable public transportation system can be annoying and exhausting. Getting to a doctor's appointment, to the grocery store, or to visit friends can be a daunting task, and it should not and does not have to be this way. Thus, reputable taxi companies, such as Yellow Cab, are offering paratransit transportation in Pomona, which included vehicles equipped to accommodate wheelchairs and other apparatuses.

Customers can schedule paratransit transportation in Pomona by calling Yellow Cab or making a reservation online with pick-up and drop-off information. Customers of all types can get that ride to the airport or appointment or even to the grocery store. The option of Yellow Cab can take the stress out of transportation if one does not have access to a car.

In addition, Yellow Cab taxis are well-maintained; thus, they are clean and smoke-free. All cabs are equipped with a GPS system as well as a phone. Customers can be sure that the driver knows the quickest route to the desired destination.

With paratransit transportation in Pomona, customers are not stuck as home or relegated to paying high taxi costs. There are options for those who have specific needs but do not want to pay exorbitant prices or deal with the hassle of public transportation.

Paratransit transportation is Pomona is becoming increasingly common for two reasons. The first is that paratransit transportation allows for customers to be picked up and dropped off at a specific location, rather than a dictated stop. Thus, the driver does not have to follow a particular route but can tailor it to the customer's needs and time. How does this differ from a cab? Paratransit transportation allows the vehicle to be shared by multiple customers, reducing the cost of the transit as a whole. There is a small number of customers, which reduces overcrowding and increases comfort. The second aspect of paratransit transportation in Pomona is how beneficial it can be for elderly and disabled persons. Dealing with the sporadic and uncomfortable public transportation system can be annoying and exhausting. Getting to a doctor\'s appointment, to the grocery store, or to visit friends can be a daunting task, and it should not and does not have to be this way. Thus, reputable taxi companies, such as Yellow Cab, are offering paratransit transportation in Pomona, which included vehicles equipped to accommodate wheelchairs and other apparatuses.

Customers can schedule paratransit transportation in Pomona by calling Yellow Cab or making a reservation online with pick-up and drop-off information. Customers of all types can get that ride to the airport or appointment or even to the grocery store. The option of Yellow Cab can take the stress out of transportation if one does not have access to a car.

In addition, Yellow Cab taxis are well-maintained; thus, they are clean and smoke-free. All cabs are equipped with a GPS system as well as a phone. Customers can be sure that the driver knows the quickest route to the desired destination.

With paratransit transportation in Pomona, customers are not stuck as home or relegated to paying high taxi costs. There are options for those who have specific needs but do not want to pay exorbitant prices or deal with the hassle of public transportation.

Paratransit transportation is Pomona is becoming increasingly common for two reasons. The first is that paratransit transportation allows for customers to be picked up and dropped off at a specific location, rather than a dictated stop. Thus, the driver does not have to follow a particular route but can tailor it to the customer\'s needs and time. How does this differ from a cab? Paratransit transportation allows the vehicle to be shared by multiple customers, reducing the cost of the transit as a whole. There is a small number of customers, which reduces overcrowding and increases comfort. The second aspect of paratransit transportation in Pomona is how beneficial it can be for elderly and disabled persons. Dealing with the sporadic and uncomfortable public transportation system can be annoying and exhausting. Getting to a doctor's appointment, to the grocery store, or to visit friends can be a daunting task, and it should not and does not have to be this way. Thus, reputable taxi companies, such as Yellow Cab, are offering paratransit transportation in Pomona, which included vehicles equipped to accommodate wheelchairs and other apparatuses.

Customers can schedule paratransit transportation in Pomona by calling Yellow Cab or making a reservation online with pick-up and drop-off information. Customers of all types can get that ride to the airport or appointment or even to the grocery store. The option of Yellow Cab can take the stress out of transportation if one does not have access to a car.

In addition, Yellow Cab taxis are well-maintained; thus, they are clean and smoke-free. All cabs are equipped with a GPS system as well as a phone. Customers can be sure that the driver knows the quickest route to the desired destination.

With paratransit transportation in Pomona, customers are not stuck as home or relegated to paying high taxi costs. There are options for those who have specific needs but do not want to pay exorbitant prices or deal with the hassle of public transportation.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/international-business-articles/yellow-cab-paratransit-transportation-pomona-3782602.html

About the Author

For more information about paratransit transportation in Pomona please visit www.yellowcab.com

Peninsula Transportation Group's Fleet of Paratransit Buses is Going "Green" in Palm Beach County

Author: John Smith

Peninsula Transportation Group's paratransit buses that serve Palm Tran, Palm Beach County's public transportation agency, are going green. Cullan F. Meathe, President and CEO of Peninsula Transportation Group, says the fleet of approximately 100 buses is in the process of being converted to propane.

Peninsula Transportation Group, one of the nation's largest privately held transportation companies, is an industry leader in the use of propane-converted vehicles for chauffeured transportation. Peninsula Propane is converting the vehicles to Propane Autogas.

Meathe said, 'Today's passengers, as well as vehicle owners, are increasingly concerned about the environment. Knowing that the buses they drive in are 'green' can be a deciding factor in choosing whom they will call to drive them to their destination. In Palm Beach County, these vehicles typically handle a total of 1500 to 1600 trips a day. Using propane in them eliminates a lot of unnecessary harmful emissions. We plan to convert more of our fleet.'

Compared to gasoline, propane burns cleaner than gasoline or diesel, with possibly 20 percent less nitrogen oxide, as much as 60 percent less carbon monoxide, 24 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions and fewer particulate emissions.

Passengers use the paratransit buses door-to-door trips in Palm Beach County for recreation, shopping, nutrition, dialysis and cancer treatments and other medical appointments. Most of the buses accommodate six regular passengers and two disabled in wheelchairs, while the others can seat 12 with two wheelchairs. The buses comply with ADA government regulations. Drivers are certified and qualified to handle the wheelchairs and their passengers.

Meathe added, 'The company is committed to advancing the use of green fuels and technology. In this country today, far too few vehicles on the road operate on propane. As most of the propane we currently use here is produced in the United State, we also could greatly reduce our dependence on imported oil if more of us made a concerted effort to incorporate green into our vehicles.'

The conversions of the Peninsula Transportation Group's vehicles from gasoline to propane are part of the groundbreaking Southeast Propane Autogas Development Program funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
Additional conversions are in progress.

For more information about Peninsula Transportation Group, visit www.PeninsulaTransportation.com

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/automotive-articles/peninsula-transportation-groups-fleet-of-paratransit-buses-is-going-green-in-palm-beach-county-3644042.html

About the Author

John Smith

10 Useful Wheelchair Tips

Author: Wheelchair Vans

1. Make Lemons Out of Lemonade - If your wheelchair is a lemon, does not conform to the terms of the written warranty, or the dealer or manufacturer is unable to repair it in the first year, you should check your states wheelchair lemon law. You may qualify for a replacement chair.

2. Rain or Shine - It is not necessary to stay home on a rainy day if you take precautions to protect your powerchair. Cover the hand control with a plastic bag, but exercise caution when using a joystick with a covering on it. Protect the drive motor by avoiding puddles that might splash or submerge the motor. Common sense is the rule, sitting in a powerchair in the pouring rain waiting for a bus is not a good idea, however, rain should not stop you from attending to life's daily activities such as going to work or a doctor appointment.

3. Get in Your Comfort Zone - It would be nice if wheelchair seats were like our favorite overstuffed chair, but sadly enough they are basically not that comfortable. So, here are some tips on getting close to comfortable. Width of the seat should be as narrow as possible without hips touching the sides. A chair too wide causes bad posture, and affects chair performance. Proper seat depth is tricky. Too deep and you slouch, too shallow and you don't have enough support and less stability. A sling backrest with adjustable tension will allow you to sit further back in the seat, while a fixed backrest allows you to sit further forward. Seat angle, commonly called 'squeeze' is when the seat seat has a permanent slope. Seat angle helps keep your weight in place, and prevents you from sliding forward. It is important to get the right amount of angle because too much can cause problems with discs in the back, curvature of the spine and pressure sores. Most manual and powerchairs have a built in adjustment which will allow you to customize the seat angle. Seat cushions provide comfort, positioning, and prevent pressure sores. The type of cushion you chose will depend on your criteria. Someone who spends all day in a chair will obviously have a different need from someone who may just use a wheelchair to go shopping.

4. All Work and No Play - For housework and cleaning, my advice would be to get your friends and family to do it, but that just is not realistic. Learning to live with a little clutter and coming to grips with the fact that your house may never be as clean as it once was might help with some of the frustration. Make sure that you have accessible outlets!!! Try plugging the vacuum cleaner in when the outlet is behind the couch and you will see why this is so important. Better yet, get a cordless vacuum! If you need to mop, always start in the corner first!! Cleaning the shower is easy with the new sprays that are on the market. Pick up clutter all through the week, it lessens what you have to do during the actual cleaning. Keep a reacher handy to get those socks that are hiding under the bed or items that may have fallen behind furniture.

5. No Need for a Spare Tire - 'Flat Free' tires no longer means made of solid rubber! Technology has evolved to include a range from foam filling, to a poly urethane tread to a rubber insert. So, the question is: Which material meets your needs? Poly Urethane tires are used most commonly on manual wheelchairs. They are highly resilient and fairly light. The life span is 3 to 4 times of the traditional rubber tire. Semi-pneumatic tires and inserts feature molded-in air pockets, much like the air pockets in the soles of athletic shoes, providing a slightly cushioned ride. Found in forms ranging from poly urethane tires to inserts, semi-pneumatic tires never need air maintenance, nor will they become flat when punctured, making them truly flat-free. On today's powerchairs, foam-filled tires, especially on the drive wheels, are the most popular flat-free solution. The foam may vary in density depending on the required weight capacity. Co-molded tires are most commonly found via powerchair casters and low-end manual wheelchair wheels. Co-molded tires are especially useful as anti-tip wheels, where durability is more important than ride characteristics. Co-molded tires have an exceptional lifespan, but the entire wheel assembly requires replacement when worn.

6. Ball in Your Court - Being in a wheelchair should not stop you from getting out there and participating in sports. Wheelchair users are now competing on a professional level. There are numerous wheelchair sports associations. Wheelchair basketball was started over 40 years ago by the Veterans Administration as a rehab program. It has grown by leaps and bounds and is now a sport. There are over 180 teams across the U.S. Quad Rugby is another wheelchair sport designed for quadriplegics who are unable to play basketball. It is a mixture of basketball, ice hockey, rugby, and handball. Power soccer is yet another great sport for those in an electric wheelchair. There are many wheelchair sports accessories available including belts, harnesses, drink holders and special back supports.

7. On the Road Again - For travel, first and foremost make sure that your chair is in good working order. Take it in for a service check. Be sure that your name and address are clearly printed on all removable parts. Use sticky labels, and cover them with a piece of clear tape. If you will be flying, be sure to notify the airline that you are traveling with a wheelchair. Airlines are required by law to stow your chair in the cabin, but don't count on it if there are multiple travelers with wheelchairs. An alternative is to gate check your chair, this will allow you to wheel onto the jetway where they will tag your chair and stow it in the belly of the plane. Remove leg supports and seat cushion and carry them on board with you. If you are unable to walk onto the plane, be sure to request an aisle chair. Always check your wheelchair for damage on arrival. Be sure to do your homework ahead of time. Check on hotels for handicapped accessible rooms, if you are going to be sightseeing, make sure that there are no barriers, arrive early at bus and train stations. Wheelchair travel can be both challenging and and rewarding, and with a little planning, it will certainly be a adventure that you won't forget.

8. Stumbling Block - Nobody ever said it was going to be easy being disabled. Learning to cope with the mountain of little obstacles that are so frustrating is a major step in the right direction. If you have diminished hand strength and function, use a wall mounted dispenser with refillable chambers and push button dispensing for the shower. This will eliminate the need for opening and closing bottles with wet hands. If grasping a utensil is difficult slide a piece of 12mm hose over the handle. Outsource your toenails and get a simple trim at the nail salon on a regular basis. Use a reacher to get at those socks from under the bed or behind the couch. Don't chase your food all over the plate, use a bowl instead. Be sure to carry straws with you if you are unable to pick up a cup or glass. A 3 ft dowel with a rubber cap on both ends works great for turning light switches on and off, ringing doorbells, pushing buttons on tv or as a pushing or pulling tool. Put a thin cord through the hole on your zippers, tie to make a loop. Be sure to join a disabled support group, as they are an amazing wealth of information.

9. Play it Safe - Make sure that your wheelchair is in good condition at all times. The top priority when considering safety are the brakes. Be sure to check them regularly, loose brakes can compromise the wheelchair users safety. Another thing to consider is stability and balance. Some guidelines to follow are: Never lean forward any further than the length of the armrests. If you do lean forward, be sure the front casters are facing forward. Do not try to pick things up from the floor by reaching down in between your knees. Do not shift your weight in the direction you are reaching as the wheelchair may tip over. For ultimate safety, it is important that you be fully contained within the wheelchair. A weakened arm or leg that occasionally drops to the side cannot be considered the ultimate in safety. Arm supports, as well as foot and leg huggers, help you keep it all together.

10. Live and Learn - Become a self advocate. Being a self advocate very simply means that you understand your own disability....you know your weaknesses and strengths, and you are able to convey this to others. So, how do you get started? Write it all down; your weaknesses, strengths, identify your disability, and what you need to do to participate in the things you enjoy, or need. Find out your rights, The American Disabilities Act will spell them out for you. Now comes the hard part for some.......Assert yourself, ask for what you need. What do you have to lose? And finally, follow up, and make the change happen.

Living with a disability and being in a wheelchair means that you have had to make changes and adjustments to your lifestyle, but you can still stay active and enjoy your life. With the above wheelchair tips, and a positive attitude, you can learn to thrive with your disability instead of letting it manage you!

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles/10-useful-wheelchair-tips-1527285.html

About the Author

AMS Vans has been providing wheelchair vans since 1998. Our handicap accessible vans are created with the highest safety ratings, the best value, and the lowest prices nationwide. Our handicap van dealer showroom is located 20 minutes north of downtown Atlanta in Norcross, Georgia GA. Drop in our wheelchair accessible vans dealership, or see over 100 handicap vans for sale on our website all about handicap vans, wheelchair accessibility, and accessible vans for handicap transportation.

The Gift of Mobility - Free Power Wheelchairs

Author: Wheelchair Vans

There are many organizations that offer free power wheelchairs and assistive devices such as hospital beds, lift chairs, walkers and other medical equipment. Here are a few:

MDA (Muscular Dystrophy Association) accepts wheelchair donations, which they refurbish and offer at no cost to persons in need.

Orphaned Wheelchairs and The Wheelchair Foundation
The Wheelchair Foundation has partnered with Orphaned Wheelchairs to deliver wheelchairs to people in the United States. Orphaned Wheelchairs takes donations of new and used wheelchair equipment, identifies recipients in the USA, and distributes the wheelchair equipment to those in need. Included are free power wheelchairs

Special Kids Fund
Special Kids Fund is an alliance of schools, hospitals, and social service organizations that provide for the special needs of children with disabilities and at-risk youth. Through the Special Kids Fund Vehicles for the Disabled Program, donated wheelchair vans and vehicles are given to physically disabled persons who are not able to afford them. This includes traditional and powered wheelchairs.

The Senior Wheels USA Program
This program makes available power (electric) wheelchairs to seniors (age 65 and up) and the permanently disabled at no cost to the recipient, if they qualify. Power wheelchairs are provided to those who cannot walk and cannot self-propel a manual wheelchair, and who meet the additional guidelines of the program.

The Wheelchair Project
The site offers an inventory list of all available wheelchairs - both manual and powered. They do not put a price on the chairs, only ask that you either pick up or arrange for delivery.

If you plan on getting a power wheelchair through Medicare or your own private insurance, it is important to note that Medicare and most private insurers will cover between 50and 80of the allowable price for power chairs for those who are eligible. The amount that your insurance company pays will depend in part on the type of mobility chair you require and the state in which you live. Be sure to do your homework, and beware of anyone who knocks on your door or approaches you on the street and offers to take you to a physician to get a free power wheelchair or scooter. Legitimate providers do not do that. Instead, they prefer to work with your existing physician. Avoid anyone who will not allow you to use your own physician and insists that you go to theirs.

It is possible to find free power wheelchairs if you are realistic about what is available. Regaining your mobility and independence is definitely worth the research!

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles/the-gift-of-mobility-free-power-wheelchairs-1527219.html

About the Author

AMS Vans has been providing wheelchair vans since 1998. Our handicap accessible vans are created with the highest safety ratings, the best value, and the lowest prices nationwide - guaranteed. Our indoor showroom featuring over 100 handicap vans is located 20 minutes north of downtown Atlanta in Norcross, Georgia GA. Drop in our wheelchair accessible vans dealership, or see over 100 handicap vans for sale on our website all about handicap vans, wheelchair accessibility, and accessible vans for handicap transportation.

February 18, 2012

Senior Care: Traveling Options

Author: Karina

State officials cannot exactly pass a regulation regarding the approval of licenses to seniors due to the inconsistency of health and capabilities of elderly people. There are 65-year olds who have a hard time seeing and driving at night, but there are also 80-year olds who can maneuver the wheel like a pro.

There are also several commuting issues for seniors, most of which are medical-related. Moreover, there will come a time when your senior loved one can no longer drive, commute, and refuse to give up their driving rights. This just proves that age is not the only thing that diminishes, but also a clear sense of judgment.

Some of the factors that limit senior citizens to drive and commute are health and physical conditions, stress, and family pressure or personal reservations to one's capability to drive.

There are various ways of getting around like carpooling, public transit programs, senior shuttles, and recently, taxi voucher programs. Here's a list to guide you in choosing the perfect neighbouring transportation for your senior loved one:

Taxi Program - This program has become more popular over the years because it is more convenient, and in some ways cost-efficient. Though it is only available in some states and varies in every community, it certainly helps to know that there are discounted taxi services available for seniors; all you have to do is ask your community center about it. The immediate requirements to be eligible for taxi vouchers are proof of age, address, income, destination, and reason they are availing. For easier access to this program in your community, you can contact the ElderCare Locator.

Carpool - This has been a known means of transportation for decades. Some neighbors are willing to drive senior members of the community. This service is occasionally free, the problem is it would mean that they are only hitching a ride with the car owner, and can't request to be dropped off to a specific destination.

Senior Shuttles - These are only available to communities that are accessible through main roads and highways. Senior shuttles are usually seen transporting seniors to and from the airport.

All in all, one should take into consideration the medical and physical needs of your senior loved one when it comes to selecting the right transportation or traveling option.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/elderly-care-articles/senior-care-traveling-options-4849754.html

About the Author

Karina loves to share her experiences as a care giver in a elder care facility in Bergen County, New Jersey, by writing articles and tips about senior care.


February 17, 2012

Transportation Options for Senior Citizens

Author: M Lewis

For the majority of senior citizens, the once-simple task of getting around eventually becomes a much more challenging task. As vision and other faculties deteriorate with age, driving becomes more dangerous, and eventually driving rights may need to be forfeited completely.

With the option of driving themselves around independently no longer available, there are still a variety of alternatives to help seniors stay active and remain able to get where they need to go.

Carpool

Carpooling is a system that has been around for a very long time, and for some seniors, this can be a great way to get around. For those who may be living in a retirement community or similar type of arrangement in which neighbors or friends with cars are easy to come by, it may not be a serious problem to depend on carpooling to get around. However, this system does not work for everyone depending on their situation and the destinations they may need to get to.

Public Transportation

Depending on the location, public transportation can be a good option for seniors: it's generally very cheap, and the rider doesn't have to depend on friends or family to get around. That being said, not every town has a convenient public transportation system. Also, the physical demands of riding public transportation may be beyond the capabilities of some seniors.

Taxis

For other seniors, the taxi is the main method of transportation. While taxis are typically very fast and convenient, they also tend to be relatively expensive. A taxi ride here and there may not seem like a lot of money to spend, but for seniors who need to get to and from regular appointments or checkups, these expenses can add up very quickly.

Non-Emergency Medical Transportation Services

In many areas in the country, there are private services that provide non-emergency medical transportation for seniors and others with medical commitments. These services are generally significantly cheaper than taxis, and come with some advantages over the other transportation alternatives. Firstly, these medical transportation providers take their customers from door to door, and the better of them are very punctual. Also, good medical transportation providers will have friendly and professional drivers, clean vans, and overall will work to create very comfortable experiences for their customers. For seniors who may need a ride to a single medical procedure, or those looking for a regular service to get them to and from weekly appointments, non-emergency medical transportation services are likely the best option.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/disabilities-articles/transportation-options-for-senior-citizens-5531286.html

About the Author

Mike Lewis is the content manager for Metro Transporation in Rochester, NY. Metro Trans provides medical and patient transportation for seniors living in Western New York


Driving after Amputation: Mobility Equipment for Amputees

Author: Ann Bransom

dual gas and brake hand control systemsAfter an individual has had a limb amputated, for any reason, a person is typically not able to drive an automobile the same way they did before. However, there are several adaptive devices that can enable an amputee to continue driving and maintain his or her independence. The site of amputation(s) will determine exactly what type of vehicle an amputee is able to drive, and what other types of adaptive equipment will be necessary. Here is a general overview of the various amputations and what equipment might be necessary with each one:

RIGHT LEG

For individuals who have had their right leg amputated, the following equipment is recommended for driving.

  • Hand Controls

  • Automatic Transmission

  • Power Braking

BOTH LEGS

For individuals who have had both legs amputated, the following equipment is recommended for driving.

EITHER ARM

For individuals who have had either arm amputated, the following equipment is recommended for driving.

  • Automatic Transmission

  • Steering Device

  • Reduced Effort Steering

  • Modified Gear Shifter

  • Modified Secondary Controls (turn signals, dimmers)

Not every vehicle can be modified appropriately, and if the amputee is also a permanent wheelchair user a lowered floor minivan may be their only option. That is why it is necessary to first be evaluated by a driver rehab specialist and then follow up with a certified mobility specialist to look at all of your adaptive equipment options as recommended by your driving evaluator.

For more information about finding a certified driving evaluator, visit ADED (Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists). They can put you in touch with a certified driving trainer in your area that specializes in working with drivers with disabilities. They will conduct your driving evaluation and then put you in touch with a QAP certified mobility specialist in your area that can then follow up with purchasing options for the recommended equipment.M.C.

Mobility Systems sells and installs all of the above equipment. Set up an appointment to meet with a mobility specialist today and let us help you regain your independence after amputation.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/disabilities-articles/driving-after-amputation-mobility-equipment-for-amputees-4455128.html

About the Author

Ann Bransom has worked in the disability industry for over 7 years. Her career has mainly focused on marketing mobility products and services and researching funding sources that will help people with disabilities purchase adaptive equipment they need. Ann Bransom currently works for M.C. Mobility Systems and can be found on Twitter and LinkedIn. M.C. Mobility Systems provides wheelchair accessible vans and other mobility equipment.

NEMT Services Index

Links to all blog posts about Non-Emergency Medical Transportation Services.

Hire Luxury Patient Transport Services in New England Area by Sonny Too - You should hire the most reputed patient transport in the area as it should provide fast, lifesaving transportation with safety. Read More...

Sacramento County Medical Transportation Services by SACPROS - MedEx Transit, Stanford Settlement, Paratransit Inc., Pride Industries, Read More...

Popular New Features on Wheelchair Vehicles

Author: Bob Lundin

If it's time for you to get a new accessible van, either because yours is getting pretty old or because you have never had one before, you will be amazed at the incredible features that can now be found on these vehicles. In the past, wheelchair vehicles only had the bare minimum that was needed to be useful, like a ramp and a strap to hold the chair in place during motion. These days, however, there are many innovations that have been made in the field of accessible vehicles. These vans have all of the bells and whistles that you could ever want, for a driving and riding experience like never before.

Some of the best new features that can be found on wheelchair vehicles that are for sale today include:

  • Hand Controls for Driving

Some of the greatest options that you can find on accessible vans today are hand controls for driving. A number of different manufacturers have developed various types of hand controls that enable anyone to control the accelerator and the brake pedals with a lever or button. These controls make it possible for people that once thought they may never drive again to take the wheel and hit the open road. These easy to use controls are a great feature when added to any type of vehicle.

  • Raised Roofs

You no longer have to worry about hitting your head on the roof when you have your wheelchair inside of many of these new wheelchair vehicles because of new raised roofs. Higher ceilings mean you have a lot more comfort and security.

  • Compact lifts

Smaller lifts that are fitted underneath the last row of seating in a vehicle means there is a lot more seating space. In the past, platform lifts could take up an entire back row of seating, but now they are much more discreet and below the seats.

  • Easy lock systems

You never have to worry about the security of your chair again, as it will stay put with one of the new locking mechanisms that are on the market. These have been designed in order to hold the chair carefully in place and are a breeze to use.

When you head out to look at the new wheelchair vehicles on the market today, check out some of these advanced new additions. You will be amazed at how affordable and useful these features truly are.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/disabilities-articles/popular-new-features-on-wheelchair-vehicles-5626186.html

About the Author

United Access is a premier provider of new and used wheelchair vans and mobility equipment in Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Tennessee, Texas, Indiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Mississippi. Visit UnitedAccess.com today to find a wheelchair lift in your area.

Questions to Consider Before Buying A Wheelchair Van

Author: Scott

1. Is the person in the wheelchair going to drive or be a passenger?

A basic question to ask when looking for a wheelchair accessible van is: 'Is the person in the wheelchair going to drive or be a passenger?' It may seem elementary; but think about it like this: there are just as many adaptive equipment solutions as there are medical diagnosis' that require them. Knowing this can propel you forward into one of two different directions and prevent you from overspending on modifications you do not need or not getting all the mobility you need by under buying equipment. Whether the person in the wheelchair will be a passenger or a driver, is not the only consideration, but it is the first and will determine how you will proceed in the selection process.

2. How much can I afford to spend on a wheelchair van?

Aside from buying a home, the purchase of an automobile is the biggest ticket item that a person will buy in their life. Adding the cost of the accessibility modifications and equipment for mobility, a wheelchair van can be more expensive than your first home.

The structure of a wheelchair van has three parts. You start off with an original vehicle, either a full size van or minivan that has been built for regular passenger use by one of the major automobile manufacturers, Dodge, Chrysler, Ford, Honda, and Toyota are the most prevalent in the mobility equipment market. Next you have to make the vehicle accessible for a person in a wheelchair by either lowering the floor (minivan) or raising the roof and door (full size) so the person does not have to get out of the wheelchair to get into the van. Finally, if the person in the wheelchair is going to drive, then you have another cost factor to consider, adaptive driving aids. These are the specialty items that permit a person in a wheelchair to manipulate the controls of the van and operate as the driver.

3. Where can I get the money?

What you end up with is a package that costs around $50,000 to $70,000 and more if you want to drive. Some vehicle modifiers will have financing programs with extended terms to lower the payment.

Below are a few more to research for loans, grants and aid in funding of your mobility equipment;

  • The Veterans Administration

  • Diagnosis specific support groups

  • Local Bank or Credit Union

  • State Funded Agencies

  • Mobility Equipment Dealer

4. What are the dimensions of my wheelchair with me in it?

Figuring out your dimensions and measurements while seated in your wheelchair may be a little difficult without assistance, but is an important matter that should be done with the greatest care and accuracy to ensure a proper fit for the wheelchair van. Having this information handy along with knowing the make, model and serial number of your wheelchair or scooter is vital information you need in order to be an educated consumer and help your mobility consultant develop a sense of your overall mobility. When taking measurements, it is important to remember to rotate, tilt and otherwise position yourself as you would when traveling so your measurements accurately reflect your need.

Here is a list of measurements, their definition and how to measure them:

  • Passenger Eye Plane: a measure of the distance from the normal plane of sight to the floor when the person is seated in the wheelchair looking straight ahead

  • Passenger Height Seated: This the measurement of the distance from the top of the head of the person seated in the wheelchair, down to the ground

  • Overall Mobility Length: This measurement is the distance from the back of the push handles to the very front of the wheelchair legs or the toes of the person in the wheelchair, whichever is longer

  • Overall Wheel Width: This is the distance that is widest on the wheelchair, typically between the hubs on the outside of the chair

5. How will I use my wheelchair van?

Think about your life and how you used your vehicle in the past. The purpose of these modifications is to get you back to that level of mobility as easily as possible. Do you want to go on long trips to see family in other states? Are you only going to use the van for trips around town? To the store or out to dinner with friends? If you have friends and family members who will travel with you, how many and what type of seating do they need? Do you use oxygen tanks or machines that you will need to carry with you?

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/vans-articles/questions-to-consider-before-buying-a-wheelchair-van-5222361.html

About the Author

Wheelchair van expert, trained, certified Mobility Consultant with Triple S Mobility, US Army Veteran, works to help people with disabilities find mobility equipment. Family business building wheelchair vans since the 80's has over a decade of working experience in the mobility equipment industry. Knowledgeable, caring, empathetic, willing to work hard to help you find the best transportation solution for your mobility needs. www.triplesmobility.com

Wheelchair Accessible Van Index

Links to all blog posts about Wheelchair Accessible Van Conversions.

Popular New Features on Wheelchair Vehicles by Bob Lundin - If it's time for you to get a new accessible van, either because yours is getting pretty old or because you have never had one before, you will be amazed at the incredible features that can now be found on these vehicles. Read More...

Questions to Consider Before Buying a Wheelchair Van by Scott - A basic question to ask when looking for a wheelchair accessible van is: 'Is the person in the wheelchair going to drive or be a passenger?' Read More...

Shopping for Handicap Accessible Vans by Bob Lundin - Did you know that you will be able to shop for handicap accessible vans online? This can be quite helpful when you do not have the time or mobility to spend several trips going to dealerships looking for the perfect vehicle. Read More...

Strategy Guide for Buying a Wheelchair Van by Bob Lundin - There is no greater thrill then buying a wheelchair van for a loved one who has a disability. This is a great way to restore a sense of lost freedom and to decrease the stress that traveling puts on the individual. Read More...

Tips for Buying a Used Wheelchair Van by Bob Lundin - While many people will benefit from the addition of mobility equipment to a vehicle, purchasing a new wheelchair van is often out of financial reach. Read More...

February 16, 2012

Mobility Company Brings Continuing Education Courses to Healthcare Professionals for Free

Author: Ann Bransom

Recent studies have shown that people with disabilities turn to their healthcare professional first for information about mobility equipment, such as wheelchairs, ramps, and lifts. Unfortunately, studies also show that these healthcare professionals don't always have the most current information about this equipment. So they often turn to consumer sources for information, such as yellow pages and the internet.

Free Continuing Education credits for occupational therapists, case managers, and physical therapists site

'Healthcare professionals are an integral part of making sure that people with disabilities get the proper equipment for their lifestyle and condition,' says Dennis Charvat, General Manager for M.C. Mobility Systems. 'Given the statistics we are getting on their overall knowledge of the mobility industry, we knew it was critical that we provide some sort of objective education on the equipment that is currently available.'

M.C. Mobility Systems responded to the need for increased education for healthcare professionals by launching a new continuing education website, specifically geared towards those healthcare professionals that work most closely with patients suffering from illnesses and conditions that effect their mobility: case managers, occupational therapists, physical therapists, driving rehabilitation specialists, and mobility engineers.

'We didn't want this to be just another brochure for the mobility industry,' says Charvat, 'We really wanted to offer something that gave an in-depth understanding of different conditions and how they necessitate different types of equipment. The equipment that will work for someone with spina bifida is not necessarily the same as the equipment for someone with multiple sclerosis.'

The new site, ceu.mcmobilitysystems.com, offers a series of courses in a variety of formats to the aforementioned healthcare specialties. Participants can choose from online formats that they complete at their own pace or live formats ranging from courses that can be completed in a lunch hour to a full day course.

Because M.C. Mobility Systems is a retail operation, they wanted to ensure that the continuing education courses being offered were clearly a separate, objective part of their business. So in the interest of keeping the continuing education courses completely informational in nature, the company decided to offer them free of charge to learners.

'Offering these courses is our way of trying to close the gap on missing information about the mobility industry among healthcare professionals,' Charvat continues. 'We want our potential customers to be getting the right mobility equipment information the first time they ask, and also give back to the healthcare professionals that have entrusted us with their patients' safety.'

Healthcare professionals are encouraged to visit the new continuing education website at ceu.mcmobilitysystems.com, to view the full line of current course offerings. Courses range from 1 credit hours up to 7 credit hours, depending on the chosen length and format. Some accrediting agencies include the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), the Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC), the Ohio Physical Therapy Association (OPTA), Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA), and the Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (ADED). The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA.

M.C. Mobility Systems American Occupational Therapy Association Approved Provider for Continuing Education logo

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/medicine-articles/mobility-company-brings-continuing-education-courses-to-healthcare-professionals-for-free-5415200.html

About the Author

Ann Bransom has worked in the disability industry for over 7 years. Her career has mainly focused on marketing mobility products and services and researching funding sources that will help people with disabilities purchase adaptive equipment they need. Ann Bransom currently works for M.C. Mobility Systems and can be found on Twitter and LinkedIn. M.C. Mobility Systems provides wheelchair accessible vans and other mobility equipment.